Friday, 29 June 2018

Using Our Knowledge to Create

Once students LEARNed about bridges and became "bridge experts" they worked together in small groups to CREATE their own project to display their learning. Groups were encouraged to work collaboratively once they selected their create task from a "101 ways to Create" poster that is hanging in the classroom.

One group, used their knowledge from the reading and came up with a list of interview questions that they wanted to ask our school's Executive Officer, Mrs. Sorenson.


Monday, 25 June 2018

Enabling Exploratory Reading

This term, I decided that in addition to teaching my reading groups the basics for reading that we all teach (decoding, inferencing, etc) I wanted my students to understand that their Chromebook is a tool for learning independently as well. We have had many discussions about how it is ok to stop when reading independently and explore online for an answer to a question that may have popped up when reading. It amazes me that my students thought they weren't "allowed" to use the internet to further their understanding of a topic being discussed in class.

So, keeping with our Auckland Harbour Bridge theme (which has evolved from our read aloud novel), students were asked to read two newspaper articles about the Harbour Bridge and then one website page about the forces of bridges.  While reading, students were asked to list important and interesting facts on a padlet, and they were encouraged to click on other links found on those pages to further their understanding to ultimately become a "bridge expert."


Students loved the opportunity to explore on their own and many took the padlet assignment seriously. 

Monday, 18 June 2018

DMIC: Planning and Understanding for Big Ideas

Step 1: Begin with the mathematics

  • -Planning takes time. 
  • -Consider what you students need in the way of Big Ideas (NZ Maths Key Ideas is another place to look for Big Ideas
    • KNOW the Curriculum for your year level
    • Google "big mathematical ideas"
    • van de Walle book is highly recommended
Step 2: Thing about your students

  • What do they bring mathematically and culturally
  • Put current knowledge and interests at the centre of instructional decision making
  • How can you best present mathematical concepts that match prior knowledge?
Step 3: Decide on a task/problem

  • Be clear about the big idea you want to connect to and explore
  • It must be group worthy with appropriate challenge level
  • Low floor, high ceiling
  • Culturally responsive and relevant to your students
  • Using bigger numbers allows for students to work at a higher (deeper) level of understanding
Step 4: Predict what will happen

  • Anticipate all approaches including misconceptions
  • Recognise what they are thinking and how to move forward
  • Identify what you're looking for and who is going to share and why

Thursday, 31 May 2018

CoL PD: Language Abdundance

Janni van Hees
Language in Abundance

Where does language occur? 
-Spoken
-Print

Keep in mind, we could have mileage in one of these areas but it is important to ask yourself is it heightening the level of complexity that the children are able to achieve. We have to be prepare to shift our pedagogical beliefs in order to make the necessary shift in our student's level of achievement.

Elaborative Style Responses

  •  Tuning into and picking up the message and meaning expressed by the child
    •   Offering more-structurally, word choices, contexts
  •   NOT posing questions or "wringing" more out of the child
  • Co-constructing and co-contributing- focused on the child and growing their language and understanding
It is important to remember to be a co-contributor by focusing and noticing. In the end, the children are in apprenticeship zone, but the teacher is the key contributor to their learning. The quality of the material and the way we role it out is very important.  However, inside our classroom there is a lot of 'knowing'.  We need to capitalise on what it known and it is our job as the teacher to raise the level of their understanding...the level of the 'known',  As a teacher, we don't have to hurry and respond, we need to be circumspect and it is ok to say "I'm thinking....". 

To and Fro Talking (Conversations): Chain Linking what you say to each other
You can't talk past each other, you need to be sure you are linking and shaping things that are connected potential paragraphs. In order for two points (made by students in a sentence form) to be chained up (to form a paragraph), they have to be related to one another. 

Next Step: Introducing the chain link method of conversation building to my literacy students in the hopes of it transferring to maths and our DMIC program as well. 


Monday, 28 May 2018

Manaiakalani Staff Meeting: Create

Today the Pt England staff had an amazing time with Manaiakalani's Dorothy Burt focusing on the Create aspect of our Learn, Create, Share model.

The cognitive challenge we have with our students is to hook them creatively to do something with their learning.  Our children need to be better problem solvers and communicators and we believe that the hook to achieving this with our students is through Creativity. 

Create: is a doing word....students need to be doing things with all of their body utilising their senses.

Visual Representation of Create in Manaiakalani




Language Acquisition: Using a Video Clip Create Task

Now that we have watched the whole video, students were asked to use what they learnt from the video and the posters we created from our discussions to create a Google Drawing poster displaying the four forces of flight as related to an airplane.

I found it interesting that the hardest part for my students was taking the notes that were displayed and writing sentences to describe each force.

Here are some examples from the class:
Latisha

Siakupega


Monday, 21 May 2018

Language Acquisition: Using a Video Clip Day 2

When we were able to have some time as a class to sit together and watch the second half of the chosen video clip, I was very surprised at the reaction from my students. They seemed to be indifferent to the idea of watching a video clip (something our students generally love).  However, once it was time to begin the discussion, they jumped right in and even some of my quietest students were willing to share, both with their partner and then with the whole class.

Once again, after watching the video, I took some notes to display on our literacy wall based on the information the students reported hearing in the video and seeing on the transcription.


I am excited to do this again either later in the term, or next term as time allows, using our School's Inquiry Topic as my video focus once again. I am very interested to see how the student's retain this information and are able to use it in the future.